“Yes No Maybe So” encourages readers to be present, have courage, and take risks

The story tells how Maya is upset about the celebration of Ramadan, because of teenage problems. Some of the problems she faces include the splitting of her parents, her best friend spending the summer “busy” with other activities, and Jamie’s struggles with finding the right words to help others. 

New+York+Times+Bestselling+Authors%2C+Becky+Albertalli+and+Aisha+Saeed+are+pictured+beside+their+novel%2C+%22Yes+No+Maybe+So%22

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New York Times Bestselling Authors, Becky Albertalli and Aisha Saeed are pictured beside their novel, “Yes No Maybe So”

  In Yes No Maybe So, a novel by Becky Albertalli and Aisha Saeed, Jamie Goldberg battles the motions of embarrassment and awkwardness that shine and reflect on other characters like Jamie’s acquaintance, Maya Rehman.

  The story tells how Maya is upset about the celebration of Ramadan, because of teenage problems. Some of the problems she faces include the splitting of her parents, her best friend spending the summer “busy” with other activities, and Jamie’s struggles with finding the right words to help others. 

  The two know each other well due to a local senate election they both volunteer for. Once the election date is near, political canvassing is especially needed, and the pair are grouped together. The two venture door to door in their community for the responses: ‘yes’, ‘no’, or ‘maybe so’.

  One could say both benefited from gathering closer, for Maya gained and replaced a friend and taught Jamie to open up about his fears, and Jamie learned to drop any habits for the mindset of failure. An example of a catalyst for personal discovery between both characters is love. Further in the story, Maya and Jamie have feelings for each other and hide the evidence due to the non-approval of dating while being a teenager from the parents of Maya. Together, they defined the odds of biracial dating and took on the world. 

  The thought and risk of taking chances, beginning with the chance of succeeding in the local election, to risking a friendship different from society, to becoming lovers suits the brightening theme. Many people and religions identify the same race or culture only for relationships, but more recently, teenagers experiment with those odds which makes many wonder the ancient rules ancestors left behind. This theme also applies to anyone taking a chance, trying to achieve any accomplishment. The two authors set out the novel to motivate young adults that there’s a special Jamie or Maya waiting patiently for them.

  Reading the story filled with excitement made my heart race at times of success and at times of doubt. Page by page, there wasn’t a moment in time in which I put the book down due to boredom or uninterest. 

  Young adults who love and appreciate the creation of romance and realistic-fictional books will find themselves to get a sense of advice on how to take on a problem they encounter. I find that the standing factor of friendship reminds me of how much it’s important to stick through thick and thin with a person you care about. 

  Furthermore, teenagers can use and read this book to get advice on how to handle events in their lives, whether it being difficulties with parents, drama from others, or just an extra boost of confidence for a person you cherish deeply.

  I believe that there is always room for improvement when it comes to the editing of a novel. There could be some setbacks with religion, for example, and how it’s taken. In the book, Maya is a Pakistani American Muslim girl, with  parents who disaprove of relationships, but Jamie doesn’t have many guidelines as Maya.

  I am not the person to doubt love, but when it comes down to feeling ready to take a step forward into another part of your life, I cautiously move forward with the affirmations of myself first. 

  Many will decipher the text the authors mention about being ready for actions based on how they were taught right from wrong and their foundation with worldly things.

  Overall, the publication taught me three valuable lessons: be present with yourself, have faith and courage, and take risks that will work towards something great.