Why you should care about the Amazon wildfires

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Why you should care about the Amazon wildfires

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 In this day and age, we’ve all thought about global warming at least once, right? I know for a fact that this growing topic has crossed my mind frequently in the past few months. 

   Well, the Amazon wildfire has been one of the central causes for worry all over the world. Showing no signs of stopping, the fiery blaze has rippled through much of the Amazon’s famous and luscious forests. In addition to the already prominent global warming, excess heat and carbon dioxide from the fires are boiling the planet even more.

   The Amazon rainforest plays an instrumental role in the absorption of carbon dioxide, and global warming is just getting progressively worse by the forests’ growing absence.  

   Although climate change has become a very pressing issue, a fair amount of people seem to brush off the severity of it. 

   Take the Amazon fire for example. When the fire first started to reach that danger level, Brazil refused to take in aid from other countries. This refusal might be the result of political issues, or issues in Brazil. However, I believe that countries and  their governments should be doing everything they can to eradicate the growing effects of global warming. 

   Politics between countries, or in a country, shouldn’t get in between efforts to solve climate change. However, not many world leaders’ main concerns involve climate change. Many governments’ first priority is often economics or societal issues. 

   Global warming typically comes up to the surface only if a major environmental disaster happens. As a result of this lack of attention, environmental disasters are becoming more and more frequent. With the gradual buildup of these disasters, our resources to combat it will eventually run out.

   However, I believe that the human race can maybe turn things around. If most countries have the primary focus of funding research for global warming, this problem won’t progress any further. Yes, global warming won’t always be the primary or the most pressing issue every time, but it should be frequently noticed by the world. 

   Why, you ask? Well, it’s because climate change is the most long term obstacle that the world has, and probably will ever face. Global warming and its effects have increased 1.9° F. annually since the early 1900’s, according to NASA. Staying on this trend, it will only become hotter in years to come. For example, the average temperature in the summer right now is about 86° F. But in about 30 years, the average temperature will change to a whopping 91° F during the summer.

  If we want our world leaders and governments to take initiative on this issue globally, regular citizens also need to contribute in living an environmentally friendly life. If people really open their eyes and see the severity and importance of this situation, participation from the billions of people around the world could possibly deter climate change. 

   Doing even the smallest of things could make a big impact. Whether it’s taking public transportation instead of driving, or just refrain from cutting down more trees. 

   Giving your attention to the environment around you is essential if global warming is to be reversed. The Amazon rainforest is never going to recover if citizens like us don’t care about it. Donations and volunteering to plant trees are just some ways to show that everyone cares. 

   Thankfully, many countries already recognize the importance of this issue. But to make an even bigger impact, more countries should try to make climate change plans as one of their bigger priorities. 

   As the Amazon wildfire rages on, countries and their citizens have started to donate millions in order to stop the fire from spreading. If you’re interested in helping out our environment, click this link, https://amazonwatch.org/donate, to donate to a cause supporting the Amazon Rainforest.